A post by guest author Axel Scheithauer: SysML is based on the UML, and I think that was a good choice. However, some concepts of the UML don’t make sense in the world of systems and then sometimes lead to not so useful ideas, like typed binding connectors (how many user defined types of equality are there?). One of these concepts is the possibility to conjugate ports. You probably know that ports are interaction points of blocks, used to connect them in...

The third and last part of the blog post series about the changes of SysML 1.5 covers several minor updates. Reception compartment Now SysML explicitly defines a block compartment for signal receptions. It is the same notation as in UML. The following figure depicts an example of the reception compartment. [caption id="attachment_1298" align="aligncenter" width="125"] Signal reception compartment of a block in SysML 1.5[/caption]   Requirement compartments The SysML specification mentions that requirement relationships could also be depicted in compartments. But the notation was not explicitly defined,...

This post is the second part of the blog post series about the changes of SysML 1.5. The biggest novelty in SysML 1.5 is only visible on the second view. If you do not use the new feature, you will not recognize it. Since version 1.0 SysML provides the model element Requirement to model text-based requirements, it has only two properties: one to specify the ID of the requirement and another one for the requirement text. SysML intends that modelers can define additional...

This blog post series presents the changes of the SysML version 1.5 that are relevant for modelers. I skip those changes that only affect the specification document like typos or rewordings. You may also be interested in the blog post series about the changes of the SysML version 1.4. The first part of this blog post series gives a brief overview of SysML 1.5. The second part covers the main change that affects the modeling of requirements, and the last part...

A post by guest author Guillaume Finance: A new EA User Group for the Enterprise Architect users and experts community will take place this year in London on Thursday 18th and Friday 19th of May. Compared with previous events, this EAUG will run on 2 days. This decision has been taken based on a recent survey where a day dedicated on training with the tool was requested. This first training day is optional, whilst the second day will include talks as on previous years. Note: where...

A post by guest author Guillaume Finance: SysML 1.4 reference cards are now available with diagrams defined with Enterprise Architect modelling tool from Sparx Systems. This alternative version, available in English and French, has been shared by Guillaume Finance. You can download the reference cards from the download section. Note: SysML is available in the Systems Engineering and Ultimate editions of Sparx Systems Enterprise Architect....

Five years ago, Erik Herzog and I had the idea for a special conference tour in northern Europe. The Nordic Systems Engineering Tour was and is still a great success. Organized by the local chapters of INCOSE in Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, and Poland it is an event from and for the systems engineering community to share knowledge and to make long lasting contacts with other system engineers. The important dates - Mark your calendars: The Call for Presenters ends at Feb...

The second edition of my book SYSMOD – Systems Modeling Toolbox – Pragmatic MBSE with SysML was published by MBSE4U. It is based on the SYSMOD version 4.1 and SysML 1.4. What's new? Updated the variant stereotypes based on my new book Variant Modeling with SysML (published by MBSE4U, 2016). The variant stereotypes are part of the SYSMOD profile. Added the integration of functional architectures. The modeling of functional architectures is described by the FAS method that is not part of...

Last week I was a panelist together with Bruce P. Douglass and Stefan Hänggi at the SWISSED conference in Zurich. The topic of the panel was “How does implementing Systems Engineering enhance an organization’s competitiveness?”. We had a very good discussion and since I was one of the panelists and not the minute taker I cannot repeat the discussion here. But my preparation notes of the panel are a good source for a blog post and I have turned my bullet...