This blog post gives you a brief overview of the SysML v2 RFP and the SysML API & Services RFP. The previous blog post introduced the RFPs and explained what it is all about. Following blog posts will present details of specific sections of the RFP’s. In December 2017 the OMG published the SysML v2 RFP. You can download it for free from the OMG website: https://www.omg.org/cgi-bin/doc.cgi?ad/2017-12-2. It lists 136 mandatory requirements and 28 non-mandatory requirements for the upcoming new SysML...

It is time for the next generation of the Systems Modeling Language (SysML). More than 10 years ago the Object Management Group (OMG) published SysML version 1.0 to provide a simple but powerful modeling language for a wide range of systems engineering problems. We have learned a lot from many industrial applications of SysML. That includes the benefits as well as the limits of SysML. Additionally, model-based systems engineering is getting more and more popular and leads to more requirements for...

MBSE4U published a new book. It is only available in German. The introduction of new technologies as part of the digitalization of the maritime domain leads to the establishment of a large number of heterogeneous non-cooperating systems in a complex system environment. With the introduction of e-navigation, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) wants to enable interoperability between established and future systems, including the more operational processes. The Maritime Architecture Framework (MAF) for describing socio-technical maritime systems introduced in this book provides the...

A blog post from my colleague Axel Scheithauer reminded me of the birthday of UML. It seems that no one - including the OMG - except him, has recognized the 20th anniversary of the UML. I will not copy Axel's blog post and instead just highlight some facts about UML and give you a gift if you read on. If you understand German, you can read Axel's blog post here. If not, try the Google-translated English version here. In 1997 the OMG has...

The OMG has voted for the SysML v2 RFP on their quarterly technical meeting in San Francisco last week. That means the set of requirements for SysML Version 2.0 is fixed and officially published. It took more than two years to write the RFP. Systems engineering modeling experts from all over the world - users and tool vendors - worked out the requirements based on the 10-year experience with SysML version 1. [caption id="attachment_1494" align="alignright" width="300"] SST Kick-off Meeting in San Francisco...

You have probably read the article “Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice” that is currently spread through the media. To be honest, it is not surprising that our world is in bad shape. We know that since decades, but our action is too lame in most cases. Political, financial, and other issues dilute real consequent actions. Currently, I work a lot on safety engineering respectively model-based safety engineering. It is an important aspect of systems engineering that comes with a set...

A post by guest author Christian Neureiter. Engineering the „Smart Grid“ has proven to be a challenging task. A critical factor for the development of dependable and robust grids is the successful establishment of interdisciplinary cooperation between different stakeholder. To serve this purpose, major research has been conducted over the last years on how to realize domain-specific Model-Based Systems Engineering. One of the most promising outcomes here is the publicly available “SGAM Toolbox” developed at Salzburg University of Applied Sciences. This toolbox...

A post by guest author Axel Scheithauer: SysML is based on the UML, and I think that was a good choice. However, some concepts of the UML don’t make sense in the world of systems and then sometimes lead to not so useful ideas, like typed binding connectors (how many user defined types of equality are there?). One of these concepts is the possibility to conjugate ports. You probably know that ports are interaction points of blocks, used to connect them in...

The third and last part of the blog post series about the changes of SysML 1.5 covers several minor updates. Reception compartment Now SysML explicitly defines a block compartment for signal receptions. It is the same notation as in UML. The following figure depicts an example of the reception compartment. [caption id="attachment_1298" align="aligncenter" width="125"] Signal reception compartment of a block in SysML 1.5[/caption]   Requirement compartments The SysML specification mentions that requirement relationships could also be depicted in compartments. But the notation was not explicitly defined,...